Prayer-Making                                                                                   

For people of any religion or none   

Strengthen your spirit and awaken your practice of prayer

This is a one-day workshop led by Bridget Belgrave. If you would like to organise this workshop in your area or for your group please contact Bridget.

I offer this workshop because I feel that prayer is hugely important – always, and especially at this time of crisis when humanity is on the verge of destroying so much life, and/or identifying and embracing new ways of living. That’s the big picture, but prayer also strengthens me every day in my personal sphere. With close ones, in working moments, when hearing the news, prayer gives me something I would not want to be without. And yet I am not part of any organised religion. My ways to pray are home-made. And I know they work. For me.

I see prayer as a special kind of communication of heart and soul that reaches towards a mysterious level of Life that each of us names and senses differently; perhaps as The Divine, Allah, God, Yahweh, Spirit, Tao, Angel, Mother Nature, the Universal Life Force. Or maybe we don’t have a name for who or what we pray to. Or we don’t sense any Higher Being listening to our heart’s poetry, longing and requests. We wonder – is there any point in prayer? In a busy day, does it make sense to give time to praying? And if so, what kind of praying ‘works’?

The purpose of this day is to stir up and explore your certainties and uncertainties. To come closer to your personal way of understanding whether and how prayer works. And to feel more aligned and connected with your own way of praying. Sharing in this exploration with others is a great enrichment and awakens new possibilities.

During the day I'll offer some of my understandings of how prayer works, and I’ll invite you to join in some simple, non-denominational practices and activities to stimulate you finding your own style of prayer-making and prayer-saying. 

We will consider:
•  What is prayer?
•  Prayer and meditation - what's the difference?
•  Who is it that prays?
•  Kinds of prayer
•  How do we pray?
•  What do we pray for?
•  Prayers answered
•  When prayers are not answered, then what?
•  Our own personal way to pray

This workshop includes:
•  Input from Bridget
•  Sharing among participants
•  Times of silence
•  Praying - each in our own way (or not praying, for those who prefer not to)

Next workshop: At present I do not have a Prayer-Making workshop planned. However, I am always open to running one. Please contact me if you would like to participate in this workshop in London or in Oxford, so I can assess interest and let you know when the next workshop is planned.

Invite me to your area or group: I am open to come to you. If you might like this, please email me to discuss details. 


Comments from participants

"I was touched by your warm welcome and everyone's openness. I also feel the workshop had significant meaning to my continuing search for inner peace and connection." J.R.

"It was so good to be able to talk about prayer in a relaxed and open way. So often, in other contexts, you find yourself having to defend your position. Your 'theoretical' input gave a good framework for thinking about prayer. I also enjoyed the balance and rhythm of the workshop." Jane Reed

"I found this workshop helpful in a number of ways...I realised how much I need to pray - also how much I do pray and can pray. I found the discussion helpful - and the drawing and visualising especially - I have kept my drawing!”  A.W.

"You led us beautifully into an area that is fraught with secrecy - even taboo! After all prayer is so, well, private. Having attended this workshop makes me want to encourage all sorts of people to attend!" Emma Stacey

"I was amazed at how gently you opened up my understanding of the hidden and  wordless territory of prayer. Daily I return to what I experienced in the workshop. It profoundly deepened my appreciation of how prayer can steady and support us in our life journey." Miranda Tufnell

© Bridget Belgrave 2016